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Published on 06 March, 2014

The crisis in Ukraine is driving people to Christ

ukraine

The radio program “Faith, Hope, and Love” draws listeners from Ukraine, Russia, and other countries
in the former Soviet Union.
(Image, caption courtesy Christian Aid)

Ukraine (MNN) — Ukraine is a powder keg ready to explode. Russia is keeping a tight grip on Crimea, and pro-Russia protests are spreading throughout Ukraine’s eastern and southern cities.

But there’s good news: the crisis in Ukraine is driving people to Christ.

“During this difficult time, my radio program [is] going on, don’t stop. And people are very, very hungry, especially now,” says Slavik Radchuk, a Ukrainian missionary supported by Christian Aid Mission, your link to indigenous missions.

“People [are] still coming to Christ like never before, [in] all churches.”

Listen to the interview here.

Christian Aid supports a total of six ministries in Ukraine. Their leaders are telling Radchuk that people are desperate for hope.

“From Crimea, we have reports that former Muslims or Muslims are coming to our churches and saying, ‘Can we pray together to God?’” says Radchuk. They don’t want to die without hope, he adds.

“This is a very difficult time for us, and all people stay together now and pray to God for peace.”

Over the weekend, thousands of people gathered at a Christian Aid-supported church in Crimea and prayed through Monday morning.

“[Missionaries said attendance was] 1806 in one church, but over 2,000 people came and stayed,” Radchuk shares.

“All night they prayed because it was a very difficult time in Crimea.”

Slavik Radchuk, Ukrainian evangelist and area director for the former Soviet Union at Christian Aid Mission, delivers a message for his Christian radio broadcast. Now through 1,000 towers, his radio programs are transmitted from Kiev to an area encompassing 100 million people in Ukraine, Moldova, Belorussia, western Russia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and many other countries. (Image, caption courtesy Christian Aid)

Slavik Radchuk, Ukrainian evangelist and area director for the former Soviet Union at Christian Aid Mission, delivers a message for his Christian radio broadcast.
(Image, caption courtesy Christian Aid)

A voice of hope
Despite ongoing protests and the tension that’s enveloping Ukraine, Radchuk’s radio program is still on the air. Three times a week, families hear about hope and peace that can only be found in Jesus Christ.

“My message is simple,” Radchuk recently told Christian Aid. “I don’t promote a certain church or denomination. I preach the message of salvation, deliverance, of healing broken hearts and families. I just invite people to read the Bible and follow Jesus.”

Read the remarkable story of how Radchuk started his radio ministry.

Today, Radchuk’s radio ministry has a reach of 100 million people in Ukraine, Moldova, Belorussia, western Russia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and others. Many listeners send thank-you letters to Radchuk, and others request copies of his messages on CD so they can pass it along to their family and friends.

“Our neighbors come over to our house when your programs are on the air because they do not have a radio at their house,” writes a listener from Kbmelnitskiy. “After your programs, we pray together.”

Prayer needed
Radchuk says literally thousands of Ukrainians are gathering together to pray for their nation. Will you join them?

“Pray for protection, because war can start any day,” he urges.

“We don’t want to have a fight with our Russian brothers, and we want to have peace. Please pray for peace in Ukraine.”

The European Union is meeting today to discuss the implementation of sanctions on Russia for their involvement in Ukraine’s crisis. Pray that their decision will not invoke further violence.

The radio ministry has received thousands of letters from faithful listeners. (Image, caption courtesy Christian Aid)

The radio ministry has received thousands
of letters from faithful listeners.
(Image, caption courtesy Christian Aid)

“[I want] to give a big thanks for all Christian people around the world who pray and intercede for our nation in this very, very critical time,” says Radchuk.

2014 marks Christian Aid’s 20th year of support for Radchuk’s ministry. Along with his radio broadcasts, Radchuk shares the Good News through television programming in more than 135 nations.

See how you can support indigenous missionaries like Slavik Radchuk through Christian Aid.

2 Responses to “The crisis in Ukraine is driving people to Christ”

  1. Levi says:

    Praise God, I’ll be praying for more.

  2. Pat says:

    Our God is mighty and awesome! Nothing can happen without His allowing it for His Divine Purposes! May He comfort, strengthen and encourage His own and work through them to save many! To His praise and glory!

Leave a Reply

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About Ukraine

  • Primary Language: Ukrainian
  • Primary Religion: Christianity
  • Evangelical: 3.8%
More News About Ukraine
Info About Ukraine
Data from the Joshua Project
Phone: 434-977-5650
Alt Phone: 800-977-5650
Fax: (434) 295-6814
Web site

Christian Aid MissionPO Box 9037
Charlottesville, VA
22906

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Call to action

  • Ask the Lord to protect Ukrainian believers.
  • Pray that the people of Ukraine may keep their freedom and independence.
  • Pray for peace in Ukraine.

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