News Archives

Story number 4 for 1 Dec 1999

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Next, new drama and radio programs have proven an effective tool in reaching Russian children with the Gospel. Far East Broadcasting Company helped to produce the radio drama “Twelve Adventures in Staritsa”, following the adventures of three Russian children as they deal with issues such as friendships, school and faith. The drama series is the first of its kind in Russia to mix a variety of social and spiritual topics with a strong underlying Christian theme. Its popularity has resulted in a book and plans for future radio programs.

Story number 1 for 15 Nov 1999

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We begin today in China where the persecution of outspoken Christians is nearly as prominent as those preaching the Gospel. Voice of the Martyr’s Todd Nettleton just returned from a trip to China. He gives more details. “Pastor Li (De Xian) was arrested on Tuesday as he was preaching again at the village service in Huadu. This time, he has been transferred to the prison in Guangzhou, which is a lot more serious.” Nettleton says Pastor Li, along with many other believers, is not discouraged by suffering. He compared him to the Apostle Paul. “There’s a man who’s dead to self and alive in Christ. He was totally unbowed by the thought of going to jail the next day. His attitude was if they took him to jail, he’d preach in the jail, and if they let him go, he’d preach at the service. When we said, “What can Americans do?”, every one of the pastors, the first thing out of their mouth was, “Pray for us.”‘

Story number 2 for 15 Nov 1999

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Next, Mission Network News’ Greg Yoder has been in Tibet investigating the status of the church there and how the western church can help lead more Tibetans to Christ. Greg, what have you learned? “Peter, there are virtually no Tibetan Christians in what’s called the autonomous region of Tibet which really a Chinese military occupation. You can probably count them on two hands. However, I’ve been traveling with International Aid Incorporated and they’ve been touching base with tent making ministries here and it looks like they’re going to assist these ministries, through special initiatives, in leading Tibetans to Christ.” Greg, have you seen any evidence that the Chinese don’t want you there. “It’s been unreal. I’ve had my phone tapped, internet filtered, computer pilfered, I’ve been followed by secret police, who weren’t too secret. But, though it all we know God will prevail, but we need people to pray for Tibet.” MNN’s Greg Yoder speaking from Tibet.

Story number 3 for 15 Nov 1999

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Physical problems will temporarily sideline the ministry of a noted evangelist. God’s Love in Action’s Sammy Tippit has been experiencing difficulties with his throat and has discovered severe vocal cord problems. Doctors warn that if rest and medication doesn’t improve the situation, then surgery will be needed. As a result, Tippit has been forced to postpone meetings in England and Armenia. Tippit is asking for prayer for his growing ministry and that God would uniquely impact his life during this time.

Story number 4 for 15 Nov 1999

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Elsewhere, Pocket Testament League volunteers sowed many seeds in Spain while on a short-term trip recently. The team reports success with the evangelistic presentation of “Treasure Island”, geared toward the local children. In addition, team members spent time each day distributing flyers and sharing the Gospel of John with area residents. As a result of this and many other Gospel distribution campaigns around the world, the League reports that many decisions have been made for Christ.

Story number 1 for 12 Nov 1999

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We begin today with a continued look at evangelical ministry in Tibet with a look at persecution facing Tibetans and Christians in the country. MNN’s Greg Yoder is in Tibet and files this report. “Chinese occupation is having both positive and negative implications when it comes to ministry in Tibet. International Aid’s Ralph Plumb says the Chinese military are everywhere. “Every meal at this hotel that we stayed at had someone at our elbow listening. Many of us had phones and computer email traffic monitored or affected somehow. All of our ministry contacts that we have were hyper cautious about their work here and they told stories of Christians being expelled from the country.” However, Plumb says this could actually be good for this country steeped in Buddhism. “In this last generation, because of the Chinese occupation, they’ve raise the last generation under atheistic communism. It’s left a kink in the armor of the Buddhist world view and so it really is in fact a very opportune time for Christian witness in Tibet.” Greg Yoder, Mission Network News, Tibet.”

Story number 2 for 12 Nov 1999

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Next, we turn to this coming Sunday which has been designated “The International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church”. Open Doors’ Terry Madison says: “We anticipate well over 100-thousand churches in America this year will join with the body of Christ worldwide in prayer for the persecuted church. It would be my hope that the pastor would preach about suffering and the fact that it is part of God’s economy.” Madison says it is important to participate because it brings encouragement and hope to others. More importantly, he hopes: “…that we remember those who are in bonds and who suffer for their faith. We look forward to people in the pew, and the pastors in the pulpit to offer praise and thanks to the Lord for those who do suffer for their faith, and to intercede on their behalf.” The top five countries on Open Door’s World Watch list are: Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Sudan, China and Yemen.

Story number 3 for 12 Nov 1999

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Haitian Christians in the Dominican Republic are facing deportation at the hands of the government. We get details in this report from Mission Network News’ Ruth Bliss. “Christian Reformed World Missions’ Dick Van der Vorst says the church is made up of mostly Haitian migrant workers, and the news is troublesome. However, their faith remains strong. “This is a people that have endured a lot of hardship and their whole lives are filled with struggles. And so, I think they take this all in stride; these kind of reports come out frequently, although I think this time it may be more serious than before.” The deportation reports follow allegations of human rights abuses in the Dominican Republic-something the government denies. Van der Vorst says not only would deportation disrupt the church, it would also break up families and place more hardship on the people. The CRWM is involved with leadership training of national pastors and giving them instruction in teaching the church. Reporting for Mission Network News, I’m Ruth Bliss.”

Story number 4 for 12 Nov 1999

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Meanwhile, World Servants reports the impact from short-term mission trips this year. So far, they say there have been more than four hundred decisions made for Christ as a result of the outreaches around the world. The multi-cultural organization has used short-term mission projects to introduce Christians to various missionary work as well as sharing the Gospel in various cultures. This year, more than six dozen communities were impacted by new churches, schools and homes that were built or repaired by the short-term mission groups.

Story number 1 for 11 Nov 1999

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We begin today in the deluged areas of Vietnam where the disaster is being called the flood of the century. Torrential rains have left hundreds hungry and homeless as they fight to survive. Far East Broadcasting Company’s Ai Nguyen (eye nwen). “They say that this is one of the worst in the last 50 years. They have reported that [there are] over 500 people dead and the loss of property is very great. The road system and railroad systems are so damaged so the relief work is very slow” Nguyen says that the situation there is critical and they’re doing their best to encourage people. “Right now, we are not in the land but we put announcements on the air to people in that area of Central Vietnam because most of the people there are our listeners-listening to our programs through the years…so we sent over the air a word of comfort and also call other churches to try to help out brothers and sisters in that area.” So far, they believe all members of the local churches survived the flooding and are actively involved in relief efforts.