Compassion fatigue sets in as Ukraine crisis drags on

By May 26, 2022

Ukraine (MNN) — Russia’s invasion has forced nearly two-thirds of all children in Ukraine to flee their homes. Some went to safer parts of the country, while others crossed the border.

No matter where they end up, these children have at least one thing in common. Life will never be the same, and going home – where most kids feel safe – probably won’t happen for a while.

“[Ukraine is] a wasteland in many instances,” Greg Yoder of Keys for Kids Ministries says.

“Even if the Russians were to leave today, the rebuilding process would be unbelievable.”

At the same time, many in the United States have stopped paying attention because the crisis leaves them feeling helpless. Studies show that prolonged or repeated exposures to helplessness are a major factor leading to depression.

“[People are] not even watching the news anymore; they’re just bombarded by all the bad news,” Yoder says.

“Sometimes, [when hearing bad news] you want to throw up your hands and say, ‘Why God?!’ but it’s in these situations that God makes Himself known.”

You can help Keys for Kids print devotionals in Russian and Ukrainian languages for kids and teens in crisis.
(Photo courtesy of Keys for Kids Ministries)

Each Mission Network News headline has a call to action; there’s something you can do about the news. Keys for Kids and its partners want vulnerable kids to have the hope of Christ. Help Keys for Kids print 200,000 devotionals in Ukrainian and Russian for children and teens.

“This is an opportunity [to be] involved long-term. Not just a one-time, ‘oh, here’s my $100,’ and then you leave,” Yoder says.

“Be praying that God would open your heart to want to do something and point you in the right direction. Then, dig in and take ownership in it (the cause).”

 

 

Header image shows houses in Irpin, Ukraine, after a Russian shelling. (Wikimedia Commons)