Despite war, church leaders are still kingdom building in Congo

By January 6, 2010

CAR (MNN) — Church leaders are
trying to figure out the best way to help the Evangelical Free Church of Congo
meet the needs of thousands displaced by fighting in northwest Congo. 

Of it, Rev. Bokospale, president
of the Congo Free Church or CECU, writes:

"Thanks
for your ongoing prayer for us. Greetings to all of you, and we want to wish you
a wonderful holiday of the birth of our Lord Jesus Chris, and a Good New Year
in 2010. May God continue to bless and care for you so that our
partnership will move forward in a good way."

According to ReachGlobal, the
church has set up a committee to share with the needs in their country.

Bokospale notes that "we set up the committee so that when we have
some money, we will be able to purchase supplies to share with the brothers over
in Congo-Brazzaville, and they would go to do that. We chose five
brothers: One is a pastor to encourage them from the Word; two are nurses to
help with medical care; also, a school teacher and another man to help
encourage them and parcel out the things we send. We are also thinking about
obtaining tarpaulins to help those who are sleeping out in the forests, much in
the way of medicines to help them, some food to strengthen their bodies, and we
must continue to pray to God that He work in people to end the fighting."

Fighting is still being
reported, and there are roughly 7500 refugees who have fled the fighting
further north into Central African Republic.

Against this backdrop, leaders
from ReachGlobal, the EFC of Congo, ReachAfrica, and the Bangui (bahn-gee)
Evangelical School of Theology are gathering for eight days of strategic meetings in the Central African
Republic to discuss ministry partnership
projects and future ministry plans.

Pray for the developing ministry partnership as they work
toward sharing the Gospel with the region. The team wants to strategically
move forward in launching indigenous African mission movements to plant
churches among the unreached people of the region.

 

 

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