News Archives

Story number 3 for 17 Jan 2000

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The growing number of Southern Baptist missionaries has prompted a
23-million-dollar expansion project. The International Mission Board of trustees
recently met and approved enlarging their crowed Missionary Learning Center in
Rockville, Virginia. This follows the seventh straight year of record missionary
appointments to Southern Baptists’ oversea teams. IMB says they’re well on their way
to a record of five-thousand missionaries by September 2000.

Story number 4 for 17 Jan 2000

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Next, there’s a new internet service that is calling Christians to evangelism. In
partnership with Ichristian-dot-com, the Luis Palau Evangelistic Association
launched what they’re calling, “First Priority” on the web. The association’s Mike
Umlandt is the editor. “That mix of how to and inspiration and motivation and some of
the very best writing on evangelism by evangelists and leading Christians who are
writing about evangelism calls church leaders and all Christians to put evangelism at the
top of our ministry priorities.” Umlandt says this will not only be a great resource for
people in the United States, but in other parts of the world. He says this is the first site
of its kind. “I’m not aware of a journal like this, like First Priority that is bringing
together the very best writing on evangelism and inspiring Christians to be involved in
the work of evangelism, helping to reach their world with the Good News.”

Story number 1 for 14 Jan 2000

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We begin today’s newscast in the Muslim world where an evangelical group is
building homes to help share Christ’s love. Shelter Now International’s Joan
Grawvunder says last year they built two-thousand homes world-wide in earthquake
and war ravaged areas. She says going into Muslim countries with assistance is an
innovative way to share the Gospel. “The best way to show the love of Christ is to
help. To be there for them. Going and hitting them over the head with the Gospel isn’t
going to help them when they’re sitting out in the rain. By going and trying to help them
through their need and living the Christian life they can see Christ better than they can
hear.” This year, Grawvunder says they hope to surpass the two-thousand home mark.
They’re appealing for more financial help so they can take the love of Christ to other
areas of the world.

Story number 2 for 14 Jan 2000

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Next, an evangelical relief and development agency is asking people to help
them meet the needs of the mudslide victims in Venezuela. The disaster killed
more than 30-thousand, leaving hundreds of thousands homeless. International Aid of
Spring Lake, Michigan is preparing to send more relief supplies. Agency spokesman
Jerry Deykstra. “Those numbers were higher than Hurricane Mitch hit Central America
over a year ago. Our first shipment should get there next week. And, were now
preparing six other shipments and they will go out within the next week or so. And,
those items include blankets, clothes, medicines, personal care items, food, cleaning
materials.” Deykstra says they’re asking people to help with shipping costs. He says
has they deliver this aid, people hear the Gospel. “It presents a real opportunity to help
people and also to spread the Good News of salvation. We’re partnering with the
evangelical association of Venezuela. And, we’re going to be partnering with them and
we’ll be meeting with them next week as we travel down there.”

Story number 3 for 14 Jan 2000

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Reaching out to the blind around the world is the key for one mission group in
their Great Commission effort. Christian Blind Mission’s President Allen Harkey
says there are more than 45-million blind people around the world and, in most cases
it’s treatable. Harkey says, because of the need, they’re spearheading the Vision 2020
plan. “God placed on my heart the challenge to eliminate avoidable blindness from our
world by the year 2020. We have come up with a strategy that promises to actually
make Vision 2020 a reality in our life time.” CBMI is currently working in 107
countries, with more than 10-thousand national workers. Harkey says they’re using
medicine to share the Gospel in hard to reach countries. “We are working in places
that are unreached with the Gospel. And, frankly, we’re able to get in to places that
purely evangelistic organizations can not go, because we’re providing medical help,
medical relief.” However, the plan can’t be successful without additional financial
support.

Story number 4 for 14 Jan 2000

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61-hundred delegates of the Baptist World Congress recently gathered in
Melbourne, Australia. Newly elected Baptist World Alliance President – Billy Kim –
addressed the crowd, emphasizing the importance of prayer. Kim is the pastor of a
large South Korean church and is also involved in other Christian organizations. He
urged Christians to be committed to daily prayer because the lack thereof leads to lack
of spiritual power.

Story number 1 for 13 Jan 2000

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We begin today in Kosovo where Christian relief and development is in
desperate need of your prayers. World Concern’s Kelly Miller says while there is
an abundance of supplies, the distribution system is a huge problem. Miller says while
starvation isn’t a problem yet, hunger is. “There are pockets areas still within Kosovo
that are receiving little or no aid. That doesn’t necessarily mean there is starvation.
There’s very, very difficult conditions. And, for those that are living in the villages many
of those places still today it’s difficult getting to them to provide that food security.”
Miller says proclaiming the Gospel is their motivation. “Our mandate is to share the
love of Christ with families world-wide. And, in this situation it doesn’t get much more
tangible than the food and the hygiene items. When you’re providing food and your
providing aid on a regular basis, that question is why are you here. That’s the question
that comes up and that’s the open door to share about your faith.”

Story number 1 for 13 Jan 2000

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We begin today in Kosovo where Christian relief and development is in
desperate need of your prayers. World Concern’s Kelly Miller says while there is
an abundance of supplies, the distribution system is a huge problem. Miller says while
starvation isn’t a problem yet, hunger is. “There are pockets areas still within Kosovo
that are receiving little or no aid. That doesn’t necessarily mean there is starvation.
There’s very, very difficult conditions. And, for those that are living in the villages many
of those places still today it’s difficult getting to them to provide that food security.”
Miller says proclaiming the Gospel is their motivation. “Our mandate is to share the
love of Christ with families world-wide. And, in this situation it doesn’t get much more
tangible than the food and the hygiene items. When you’re providing food and your
providing aid on a regular basis, that question is why are you here. That’s the question
that comes up and that’s the open door to share about your faith.”

Story number 2 for 13 Jan 2000

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Meanwhile, Christians from Latin America will be the people who have the
most success in reaching the Muslim world for Christ. That’s the word from
CAM International’s Doctor Ron Blue. “Some of our Spanish-speaking people are
the most adept from reaching Muslim people. So, we have a lot of Spanish speaking
missionaries who have learned Arabic and are working in places like Morocco and
Saudi Arabia. There is a definite affinity, of course people even look alike and they
relate well. They’re not a threat. We from North America are a threat to Muslim
people.” According to Blue, more missionaries will be coming from Latin America than
in any other area of the world. “This is God’s work. He’s going to penetrate that 10/40
window that a lot of people are fixated on, but they’ve missed the open door. Latin
America, the open door to reach that closed window. And, in our area, especially
Central America, Guatemala have become a great leader in missions.”

Story number 3 for 13 Jan 2000

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An increased number of protests have been directed toward the Federal
Communications Commission after recently limiting the amount of preaching
that a public television station can air. Several U-S congressmen filed a letter of
protest to the FCC Chairman saying that the policy that was implemented amounts to
an unconstitutional restriction of religious speech in the United States. Officials with the
National Religious Broadcasters say if the FCC decision is upheld as many as 90
stations would have to comply.