The lies of the ayatollah

By August 3, 2009

Iran (MNN) — Now more than ever, Iranians want to know the
truth–the truth about their government and their religion.

Since the June 12 elections and the ensuing demonstrations
protesting electoral fraud, people in Iran are learning more and more about the
true nature of their political leaders and their supreme spiritual leader, the
Ayatollah, who directly influences politics.

"Over 70 percent of the Iranian population is under the age
of 30 and have been called the ‘Children of the Revolution.' Since they were
born, they have heard that Islam is the only true religion and that the
Ayatollah is the mouth piece of Allah. And furthermore, he is viewed to be a
man of justice, honesty, purity and holiness," said Lee DeYoung, Vice President
of Broadcasting at Words of Hope.

"Thus, when young people saw corruption in
their homeland, they would blame it on politicians and not on the supreme spiritual
leader himself," DeYoung continued. "But for the first time, this generation has realized that all
the politicians are under the direct influence of the supreme spiritual leader."

This new discovery has caused great frustration among
Iranians as they learn they have been lied to and manipulated by their
government and religion their whole life.

"They have become so frustrated that they turned up in
masses shouting on the streets of the cities, ‘Death to the Ayatollah.' They
are turning away from Islam. Many had already been far from practicing that
religion with any faithfulness," DeYoung said. Since the Islamic Republic
Regime began 30 years ago, there has never been this much unrest and
dissatisfaction.

DeYoung also said that in these demonstrations, Neda Soltani has
become a symbol for the Iranian protesters. In June, Soltani was killed by a
sniper as she was on the street outside a car about a kilometer away from the
protests. The sniper has since been identified with a pro-government militia.

Also, rumors have circulated about Soltani being a
Christian. These rumors started when a photo was published of her wearing a
cross and not wearing a head-covering. The cross suggests she might have been a
Christian, and the lack of a head-covering shows she probably did not
faithfully practice Islam.

The Iranian government also did not allow Soltani to have a
public memorial service and have tried to keep her profile low, though most
attempts at this have failed.

Words of Hope and DeYoung are encouraged as Iranians become
more disillusioned with Islam because this means many will be open to the
message of Christ.

"We pray that the disenchanted masses in Iran may learn that
Jesus is the way, truth and life. No one can come to God exempt through Him," DeYoung
said.

He also said many Iranians are leaving the country as the
situation continues. He asked for Christians to pray for these people who leave
the country and face challenging times in the places they go. Also, he asked for
prayer for the people who remain, Christians and non-believers.

DeYoung concluded his petition of Christians by saying, "It's
a time for believers in Jesus Christ to pray for Iran and for her people, an
increasing number of whom are looking to Jesus Christ as their only source of
hope."

Click here for more information about the ministries of
Words of Hope.

Leave a Reply