Ukrainians fearful following Crimea referendum

By March 18, 2014
Ukrainians gathered on the Maidan square in central Kiev, and in city squares around the country, for prayer meetings to ask God for His hand to be upon the situation in Ukraine.

Ukraine (MNN) — “I see lots of fear and anxiety when I talk to people.” That’s the word from the President of Russian Ministries Sergey Rakhuba following the Crimea referendum on Sunday. Rakhuba is in Ukraine this week, arriving there Sunday in time for the secession vote.

Ukrainians gathered on the Maidan square in central Kiev, and in city squares around the country, for prayer meetings to ask God for His hand to be upon the situation in Ukraine.

Ukrainians gathered on the Maidan square in central Kiev, and in city squares around the country, for prayer meetings to ask God for His hand to be upon the situation in Ukraine. (Photo by Boris Volkov, Russian Ministries)

Rakhuba says the fear and anxiety is prompted by a massive propaganda effort by Russia and President Vladimir Putin. “They think that nothing can stop him from invading the rest of Ukraine, or at least the eastern regions. We see now that there are more pro-Russian people uprising now.”

However, Rakhuba says these individuals aren’t Ukrainians. They’re Russian thugs. “Russian thugs are there to provoke violence. As soon as Ukrainian authorities respond, then Russia will say, ‘Sure, you see? Russian people were attacked.’ Russia is using so much disinformation today you would not believe.”

What can fix the anxiety? Rakhuba says, “They want to see that the world community is standing behind them and they are ready to defend them.”

Ukrainian troops are powerless. They don’t have the fire-power to go up against the Russian military. Despite that, Rakhuba says, “Mobilization was declared by the acting President of Ukraine Oleksandr Turchynov¬†and brings even more anxiety.”

This young woman prays for her country.

This young woman prays for her country.

Is there unity in the body of Christ? Rakhuba says, No. There appear to be three sides. Some say do nothing and pray. Others suggest that the church needs to become militant and be more active in seeking freedom. Others side squarely with Russia.

The anxiety and uncertainty, however, is causing a craving for truth, says Rakhuba. “[Ukrainians] are so hungry for the Gospel. They’re so hungry for true answers, answers about eternity [and] about hope in Christ.”

Russian Ministries is raising money for Scripture. “We are working to print hundreds of thousands of copies of the Gospel of Luke that will be distributed across the nation. We [have] already seen how much people are open to the Gospel today.”

You can support Russian Ministries by spending significant time in prayer for the Ukrainian people. You can also help with their Gospel of Luke distribution effort that could be the basis of revival in Ukraine.

Click here to give generously today.

4 Comments

  • Lois says:

    Is Sergei Rakhuba speaking of fear amongst Crimeans or the greater population of Ukraine? Also, are the references to unity in the Church Ukraine-wide or, again, limited to Crimea? I have read (and heard directly) other views that suggest that the Church is active during these times, at least in Kyiv, so I would like some clarification or explanation of this position.

    • Your Name says:

      Dear Lois, greetings from Ukraine. I just arrived in Kiev after after spending several days in southeastern Ukraine. In the interview to MNN in regard of fear I was referring to the greater Population of Ukraine… People here are very concerned that Russia after taking over Crimea can invade further to main land… thank you for praying for Ukraine.

  • Greg Yoder says:

    He’s speaking about the greater population of Ukraine. References to the unity of the Church is in both Ukraine and Russia. The disunity isn’t stopping church activity. Many Ukrainians are responding to those who are sharing the Gospel. The unity issues are related to the politics of the region. As Sergey told me in the interview, there are three sides in the conflict: Those who are passive, those who side with Ukraine, and those who support Russia. Hopefully that helps you. If you’d like further clarification, you can direct your comments to Sergey here and I’ll have him answer your questions here.

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