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Jobs provide hope and a future in Haiti

By September 15, 2010

Haiti (MNN) — The United Nations peacekeeping force in Haiti just launched three major
rehabilitation projects in an effort to help Port-au-Prince recover from the
quake damage.

Organizers
hope the jobs created will not only boost employment, but also reduce violence
throughout the city.

Nine months
after a quake leveled Haiti's capital city, jobs are slow to recover. Without jobs, Dean
Yoder with Christian World Outreach explains, "90% of the people are unemployed. With thousands
and thousands of people living in tent cities, it's very difficult to get them
to move out of there."

The slow progress in recovery
jeopardizes the health of young mothers and their unborn children. According to the UN, in post-disaster
situations there are more pregnancy complications, unplanned pregnancies, and a
notable uptick in violence against women.

Unless they can provide for
themselves, it's unlikely the mothers will be able to provide good care for
their babies. Yoder explains, "We're told that between 40% and 50% of the
girls aged 13 to 18 are pregnant.  So,
we've developed a program to teach some of these girls a vocation: sewing,
cooking, crafts, to help them make a living."

CWO's resource center in Port-au-Prince was undamaged in the quake, so classes started this week. "They are starting their first class of 25
ladies that we have brought from the tent city. They will be given a five-month
course. We will loan them money to start
their own business."

Not only do the classes provide a
routine to follow, they also provide hope and a future. "As a
part of the school and their training, they will attend a Bible study
class where they are presented the Gospel."

Does a vocational training class
make a difference against the desolation of Haiti? You bet it does. Yoder says,
"It makes a great deal of difference because they can earn a living to support
their child. We had 31 ladies last year in our cosmetology class. When they
graduated, 30 of them already had jobs."

You can help keep the program
running. Funds are the only thing
limiting CWO from doing more. Click
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