Texas power grid overwhelmed by winter storm

By February 22, 2021

USA (MNN) — Unexpected freezing weather in Texas last week led to an overload of the electrical grid. Millions lost power for days, and roads were closed due to ice and snow.

In fact, the power grid almost went down for months. Only controlled blackouts prevented the grid from suffering serious damage. Read more here.

Many Texans have now had power restored, but half the state remains under a boil-water advisory after pipes froze and leaked. Sammy Tippit of Sammy Tippit Ministries lives in a highly affected area. “The first day, we would have maybe 30 seconds or one minute of electricity, and then we would have hours without it. Of course, then the ice and the snow came in. So they closed many of the road systems down. On our side of town, everything was closed, nothing was was open. No grocery stores, no gas stations, no anything. So you were basically stuck in your house with no electricity, no heat, no internet connections or anything.”

The need for revival

Texas is the most energy-independent state in the U.S. But Tippit says this storm should be a reminder of dependence on God, and the need for revival.

Next week, Sammy Tippit Ministries will be co-sponsoring a conference called Heart Cry for Revival. Tippit says, “I don’t believe it’s any accident that we’re having this next week. The pandemic has [lasted] for one year now. And with this weather condition across the nation, I believe the Lord is trying to speak to our hearts.”

The conference runs this Wednesday through Friday, and registration is free. The conference will be held exclusively online this year. Wednesday and Thursday will focus on church leaders and students respectively. Tippit says, “Friday, which I’m sort of leading, is the day for the international Church. We’ll have speakers from China, from India, and Iran sharing what God’s doing in those countries.”

Pray also that Christians will reflect Christ’s love in the midst of this disaster in Texas.

 

 

The header photo shows the storm engulfing Texas and other U.S. states. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain)